windows versions you didn't know

Discussion in 'Main Lounge' started by blackhat, Jul 21, 2006.

  1. blackhat

    blackhat

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    1991-1998 - Cairo (a "true object-oriented OS") planned after Windows NT



    Cairo was the code name for a project at Microsoft. Its charter was to build technologies for a next generation operating system that would fulfill Bill Gates's vision of "information at your fingertips."



    Cairo used distributed computing concepts to make information available instantly and seamlessly across a worldwide network of computers.



    Cairo was announced at the 1991 Microsoft Professional Developers Conference by Jim Allchin. It was demonstrated publicly (including a demo system for all attendees to use) at the 1993 Cairo/Win95 PDC. Microsoft changed stance on Cairo several times, sometimes calling it a product, other times referring to it as a collection of technologies.



    At its peak, Cairo was one of the largest groups at Microsoft and employed a majority of the company's senior engineering and design talent.





    Despite its near-mythical status in the computer industry, all of the Cairo technologies are now available except one.



    RPC shipped in Windows NT 3.1. The User Interface shipped (in stripped-down form) in Windows 95. X.500 shipped as part of Active Directory in Windows 2000. X.400 shipped as part of Microsoft Exchange Server. Content Indexing is now a part of Internet Information Server and MSN Search.



    The remaining component is the object file system, now called WinFS. It was originally planned as part of Windows Vista but development was cancelled in June 2006, with some of its technologies to be merged into other Microsoft products.





    1996 May 3 - Windows Nashville (windows 96) (cancelled) (Became windows 95B.)



    Nashville was the codename for a canceled operating system upgrade for Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows NT 4.0, which was originally intended to be released in 1996. For Windows 95 users, Nashville was intended to be a fairly minor update that would bridge the gap between Windows 95 and Memphis (popularly referred to as Windows 97), the next major version of Windows (eventually released as Windows 98). For Windows NT users, Nashville would be an interim revision between the releases of Windows NT 4.0 and Cairo, which was due at the same time as Memphis (after a series of delays, the next major version of Windows NT was finally delivered as Windows 2000). Due to its position between Windows 95 and Windows 97 (as Memphis was then known), the press often referred to Nashville as Windows 96.



    Microsoft claimed that Nashville would add Internet integration features to the Windows 95 and NT 4.0 desktop, building on the new features in the Internet Explorer 3.0 web browser (due for release a few months before Nashville). Touted features included a combined file manager and web browser, the ability to seamlessly open Microsoft Office documents from within Internet Explorer using ActiveX technology and a way to place dynamic webpages directly on the desktop in place of the regular static computer wallpaper.



    While the Nashville project itself was cancelled, many of its planned features were introduced with later versions of Internet Explorer and Windows. In particular, much of the Internet integration functionality, including the combined file manager and web browser, could be added to Windows 95 and Windows NT 4.0 by installing Windows Desktop Update, included as part of Internet Explorer 4.0 (also codenamed Nashville and released in 1997) or by upgrading Windows 95 to Windows 98.





    # 1999 December - Windows Neptune was sent out to beta testers but was never released. Should have been a consumer version (i.e. home edition) of Windows 2000.



    Windows Neptune is a version of Microsoft Windows that was shown as a technology demonstration of a possible home consumer edition of Windows 2000. It is unknown whether Microsoft ever intended to release it. After Neptune was shown, the "Whistler" project was formed that eventually went on to become Windows XP. Development on Neptune ended in Januar
     
    blackhat, Jul 21, 2006
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  2. blackhat

    Jason

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    Thats interesting. Cairo sounds familiar. I wonder where these names come from like Windows Neptune. Funny how many failures they've had but still turn a profit.
     
    Jason, Jul 22, 2006
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  3. blackhat

    Ranukano

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    I actually don't find it suprising, Microsoft always seems to make some sort of accomplishment even if the overall project is a failure.
     
    Ranukano, Jul 23, 2006
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  4. blackhat

    Synapse

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    most windows code names come from BC, in the area that the MS Head Office is. Whistler (XP Codename) was a mountain, as is BlackComb (Vista successor). Longhorn (Vista code name) is the bar that the Microsoft executives go to down there. A lot of the names come from the area, rather than out of nowhere.
     
    Synapse, Jul 26, 2006
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