Opinions on partitioning VISTA

Discussion in 'Installation & Compatibility' started by daArch, Nov 11, 2007.

  1. daArch

    daArch

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    Just getting started with Vista. Pre loaded on a new Dell Inspiron 531. 320 GB HD. 2GB RAM.

    "Graduating" from win2K.

    I have been in a habit of creating partitions for: (C: ) OS (20 GB) ; (D: ) & (E: ) - optical drives; (F: ) Programs (25 GB); & (G: ) Data (75 GB) (sizes approximate)

    Questions: <UL><LI>Is there any reason NOT to partition VISTA ?</LI><LI>Do I need the existing (D: ) for "Recovery" if I use other back ups?</LI><LI>What would your opinion be as to the size of the OS partition? Remember, new programs will be located in their partition, but system files on (C: ) will still grow. </LI>[/list]

    I have discovered how to create and resize VISTA "volumes", so I shouldn't need help with that. I guess Partition Magic don't work w/ Vista

    TIA
     
    daArch, Nov 11, 2007
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  2. daArch

    kingofnexus

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    1) 2 reasons why you needen't bother, 1 is that it will not make your computer go anyfaster (some may say it slows down the speed at which data can be accessed from your HDD but this is negligible), 2nd is that it reduces the amount of space that can be used on your HDD. Imagine that you have filled up the HDD, with 250MB left on each partition, and you need to install a program wich is 500MB. You would have had 750MB free with 1 partition but instead you can't install it anywhere with out farting around moving files. The problem gets worse when you have large programs such as 3dsmax or games to install which can take over 4GB of space.

    2)You dont need the recovery partition if you have a recovery disk/ other ways to recover your computer when everything goes wrong.

    3)I'm not sure how much space to leave for the system files. The sp1 download for a fresh vista installation is over 1GB. sp2 might be even larger.
     
    kingofnexus, Nov 11, 2007
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  3. daArch

    cyclic

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    However if you have your OS on one partition (20G is plenty) and data, games etc; on other partitions you dont lose everything if the OS goes t..up, also maintenance is a lot faster on smaller partitions, there's a big difference from defragging a 20 or 40 gig drive than a 250 or 300.

    Personally I prefer a number of partitions for various reasons, above are some, I have always found it to work well, also when I use Acronis to image my OS drive it's only about a 7 gig image............where the hell would I put an image if all my files were on one drive, I got over 100Gig of games plus music, vids waiting processing, the image size would be logistically nightmarish and would take hours to create and god knows how many to restore.

    MY current layout in partitons is one each for, Vista, XP PRO, downloads,backup, games, more games, data and general, plus an external for archived stuff.

    I don't think there is either a correct or incorrect way to do it, with NTFS you can use the whole drive and create folders which can be mapped as drives, but that's just the same as partitioning really only the more files you get on one drive the sooner your MFT will get screwed unless like me you got retail Diskeeper Pro which allows you to pad the MFT to prevent it fragmenting.......handy bit of kit that!
     
    cyclic, Nov 11, 2007
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  4. daArch

    daArch

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    thanks kingofnexus and cyclic,

    I understand fully the reduction of space with partitions, had that problem with a small HD, also had another bad experience with the Linuxboot partition on Linux/Win2K dual boot. But, I've grown fond of partitions for organizational purposes and as cyclic says, for ease of back up with Acronis.And with the large HD's available today, I do not worry about space.

    This is one of those personal preference things where there prolly is no right or wrong.

    cyclic, So you think 20 gig is good enough for Vista? As I stated, I have that for win2K on my (now) old box, but because I save ALL myworthwhile emails I've used about 12 gig.

    And that leads to another question (or perhapsconfirmation of what I've read), is it true that I can easily move the Windows Mail storage folder to another partition? That would reduce the space needed on C.

    again, thanks for your help
     
    daArch, Nov 11, 2007
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  5. daArch

    cyclic

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    Very easy to change the loction, open windows mail and click on 'tools' and then 'options' at the bottom of the menu, now you got that screen up click the 'advanced' tab, far right followed by the 'maintenance' button near bottom right of that page. On the left side of this page there are 2 buttons one for 'clean up' the other for 'store folder'..........I reckon from here you probably can do the rest. Personally I find it easier to move it if you have already created a folder on the drive you want the store on, it's then easy just to browse to it and then apply.........job done all your mail is now in a different location, something which I have always done since even a reasonable amount of those small mail files adding to the folder daily sure can frag your HDD faster than anything so to have it on other than your OS drive makes a lot of sense, as indeed does moving your temp internet files, History and cookies, especially if you have a dual boot, move these and point both systems at the same folder and 'voila' less fragments on your system drives and both systems using the same files, so even if you dont boot to one for a month the cookies and everything are still up to date.............never could see the point of duplicating effort.

    Now you got a good reason to partition, all the nasty little 'I'm gonna frag your file system' files are on their own drive and don't slow down your system.

    This isn't rocket science...'just the appliance of science Colin' (quote from ancient Zanussi advert which your probably too young to remember, I however isn't)
     
    cyclic, Nov 11, 2007
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  6. daArch

    daArch

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    Sorry,

    Just started looking at my Disk Management and noticed a 55 gig partion unlabeled and defined as EISA Configuration.

    Quick search on internet leads me to believe this is unique to Dell machines and is not necessary nor is it easy to reformat merge into a partition of my choice.

    Comments?
     
    daArch, Nov 11, 2007
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  7. daArch

    WAW8

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    One other, and in my mind, important, reason to have multiple partitions is system backup and restore. The higher-end Vista versions, and third party vendors (Acronis, Paragon, Symantec) provide SW for doing a complete image of your volumes, storing those images to online or offline storage, and then restoring your volumes.



    If you have only one partition, you can't backup online, instead, you have to do that to a plugin drive. Although I haven't experience this myself, I've seen posts in the various vendor forums indicating that writing the backup image directly to an external drive is less reliable (something to do with reduced error checking) that writing the image to an internal drive. Thus, I always backup my OS partition to a different one, and then copy that to an external drive.



    The other plus, as others have pointed out, is that by having multiple partitions, you can do smaller backups which will take less time and space.



    So, my recommendation is to have two partitions, one for the OS, the other for your data files.
     
    WAW8, Nov 12, 2007
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