How to seperate Documents/Settings from main C/ partition?

Discussion in 'General Technical' started by veii, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. veii

    veii

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    Hi. I've just bought a new HP with Vista Premium installed on it and am so impressed (is this actually Windows??) I'm actually thinking of keeping it and moving from Ubuntu to Vista! (Makes a change. lol)



    In Linux I used to create seperate partitions for everything, which makes re-installing a breeze because all you have to do is re-install your programs and you don't lose any settings/data etc...



    I used to create a 7Gb / (root), 200Mb /swap (page file) and the rest for /home (Documents and Settings)



    How would I go about doing this in Vista Premium? What sizes would be good? Maybe 60Gb C/ 2Gb Page and the rest for /Documents and Settings?



    My specs are AMD X2 64 4450e, 4Gb pc2 6400 800Mhz, 320Gb SATA 300, ATI HD3450.



    Many thanks, Mark.
     
    veii, Apr 14, 2009
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  2. veii

    WAW8

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    The filesystem philosophies, the volume usages, the default file locations -- these are so different between Linux and MS Windows, it's hard to describe them in simple terms.



    Let me just say that the file organization flexibility you're familiar with in Linux simply won't work in MS Windows. True, you can "move" some of the default folders to another partition (what is called a "drive" in MS Windows terminology), and you may be able to provide a different partition specification for storing personal/data files for the various applications -- but beyond that, there's little else you can do regarding specifying WHERE to put various things.



    Additionally, Vista needs HUGE amounts of space to store stuff -- much of that beyond your control. For example, the registry (basically, a bunch of files), can not be moved outside the "root" partition, nor can the SxS folder -- which stores a backup copy of every system file replaced with every single Windows Update. The hibernation file and the swap are also locked into the root partition and (AFAIK) can not be moved elsewhere.



    For example, on one system, I have Vista 32-bit business, MS office 2007 (minimal apps), a couple of other apps -- no videos, no gigabytes of music files -- and this takes over 15GB of storage, and this is with all the data file I can stored in a separate NTFS partition. On the same machine, Ubuntu 8.04 (with the same kinds of apps, including Open Office 3.x), including root and home, takes up less thatn 1/3 of that space.



    So, where you may think of "root" on Linux as being small, you need to think of "C" on Vista as being large. Don't forget, every Windows Update and every Service Pack adds to the space used on "C", as well as every application installation's core files and registry usage, as well as every user account, all the services, and all the drivers.
     
    WAW8, Apr 14, 2009
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  3. veii

    veii

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    Thank you very much for the replies. So basically I think what I'll do is probably just keep my music/videos/documents on different partitions and external hard drives and leave a hefty C/ of about 100Gb for any games and applications.



    Many thanks, Mark.
     
    veii, Apr 14, 2009
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  4. veii

    WAW8

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    Actually, I think you CAN install the great majority of your games files on a partition other than "C". Don't do gaming much, so can't give you specifics, but from those I've seen, you install the application stuff on "C" and the saved games on another partition.



    So, I don't think you'll need 100GB for "C". I've got a Vista Ultimate system with a LOT installed, and it fits nicely into 35GB.
     
    WAW8, Apr 15, 2009
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