Corrupt Vista Recovery Partition

Discussion in 'General Technical' started by ambledl, Nov 19, 2007.

  1. ambledl

    ambledl

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think I've seensome answers to my queries elsewhere in this forum but still aren't wholly confident or clear on the solutions so my apologies for any repetition. I'm a relatively novice (but silver-haired!) home PC user. My first ever PC, a Dell C521, came 9 months ago with Vista pre-installed on C: and a 10gb recovery partition (D:) on the same hard drive. Following a recent catastrophic failure (posted elsewhere in this forum) I've had to do a full rebuildfrom scratch, a steep learning curve, and now seem to have a full working system once more.

    But....... On my first attempt to restore Vistafrom the reinstallation DVD that came with the PC I mistakenly selected D: for the restore.On realising my mistake I reinstalled to C: and my system seems to be working ok.

    Except......I now have a virtually full D: drive containing mostly a corrupted Vista installation which I would like to get rid of. Also, at eachstartup I get asked to select one of2 Vista operating systems. My second choice always fails so I suspect that is a D: boot and that my original installation to D: has formatted it as a bootable drive, albeit with a corrupt Vista operating system.

    So........ My questions are: a) how do I get rid of the Vista content of the D: drive? It will not allow a Delete from Windows Explorer. b) Is it advisable and safe, at the same time, to format D: as a non-bootable drive?If so how can this be done? Presumably D: doesn't need to be bootable and making it non-bootable would presumably get rid of the the selection screen for 2 Vista systems on startup. c) Is it necessary to have such a large (10Gb) recovery partition? If not can it be easily reduced?

    Lastly......... I hope it is possible to do any or all of the above without wiping my whole system and doing another full rebuild, not a pleasant job for this slow-fingered user.

    Thanks in advance.

    David

    Bristol, England.
     
    ambledl, Nov 19, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. ambledl

    kingofnexus

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,024
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    England
    OK, I'll answer your last question first. As you have accidently overwritten your recovery partition, the recovery data is no longer there. As you have a recovery disc this is no problem. However you can pay for a third party recovery program which regulary backs up your vista and all important documents, so you can get working again quickly from the recovery partition, but its not completely necessary. I think cyclic on here can divulge more information on backing up than I can.

    Now, to get rid of that D: partition. Go into start menu, and right click 'computer' on the right, and select 'manage'. On the window which comes up, click on 'disk management' on the right hand pane. This should bring up a screen inside the windows with your partitions listed. You should be able to right click the D: partition, and hopefully delete it. If not, try formatting it first, then deleting it. You can then right click C: partition and extend it into the free space you have just created.
     
    kingofnexus, Nov 19, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. ambledl

    WAW8

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2007
    Messages:
    3,541
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Northern Virginia, USA
    If removing the D: partition doesn't remove the second Vista entry in your OS selection upon boot, suggest downloading VistaBootPro or EasyBCD. Either one provides an app that allows you to customize the Vista boot loader -- and remove the second entry.
     
    WAW8, Nov 20, 2007
    #3
  4. ambledl

    ambledl

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks to both for the the advice. Removing the partition got rid of the second Vista OS selection at boot up (I first tried a format which did not). I guess I will never know what was on the RECOVERY drive D:, I certainly never paid any attention to it before though I suppose Dell must have thought it had a purpose as they supplied it as part of the build on my PC. But its removal hasn't had any adverse effects and, as you say, it seems like I don't need it anyway as I rebuilt my system using the DVD supplied.Going through all the subsequent fiddly bits, setting up accounts, restoring user data from my own backup, desktop restore, application reinstallation, anti-virus and on and on and on was I suppose a good education so it hasn't been wasted andposting my couple of queries has introduced me to the usefulness of thishelpful forum.

    David.
     
    ambledl, Nov 20, 2007
    #4
  5. ambledl

    kingofnexus

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,024
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    England
    Glad to hear everythings working fine again. Its true that the more you mess up your computer and get it working again the more that you can learn.
     
    kingofnexus, Nov 20, 2007
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.